Saturday, August 27, 2016

Saxophonist Richard Elliot Celebrates His Funk And R&B Roots On "Summer Madness" - #jazz





Elliot joins forces with trumpeter/trombonist/producer Rick Braun on September 9, 2016 release

When tenor saxophonist Richard Elliot began preparing Summer Madness, his follow-up to 2014’s critically acclaimed Lip Service, he knew exactly what he wanted to do. First and foremost, it had to be funky. “When I was growing up in the ’70s and first learning to play the saxophone,” he says, “I was mostly attracted to instrumentally based R&B and to jazz that had R&B roots. This record definitely goes down that path, leaning more on the funk side.”

He also knew precisely who he wanted to accompany him on the new music. “I wanted to involve my band,” Elliot says. “A lot of artists tour with a group of musicians, and then when it’s time to make a record they hook up with a producer and go into the studio and use completely different people that maybe they’ve never even met before. I feel that if you’re lucky enough to have a regular group of musicians that you work with, and you don’t draw on their talent and their inspirations, you’re short-changing yourself.”

Summer Madness, set for release on September 9, 2016 via Heads Up, a division of Concord Music Group, is a new kind of Richard Elliot recording. For one thing, the cast includes two other horn men augmenting Elliot’s signature sax work: trumpeter/trombonist Rick Braun, who also produced the album and, on several tracks, baritone saxophonist Curt Waylee. Most importantly though, the music was created from scratch as Elliot and his handpicked musicians formulated and honed their ideas in the studio, with Braun’s ultra-capable guidance. For Elliot, recruiting the additional players and having the entire band—plus a well-respected veteran producer help him shape the music—was integral to the project’s success.

“I didn’t want to direct them,” he says. “I wanted to bring them in and let them be part of the process—the writing, the arranging—and to do it all together. I had a lot of confidence that these guys are mature enough musically. Everybody brought what they do to the table and we all put our heads together. We didn’t have rehearsals first, we didn’t have writing sessions first. We booked some days in the studio and the music just poured out.”

The result of these impromptu jams—seven new originals and three classic interpretations—is unquestionably one of the most electrifying and gratifying recordings of Richard Elliot’s three-plus-decade solo career. From the opening salvo, a super-funkified take on Spyro Gyra’s “Cachaca,” through the closing “Mr. Nate’s Wild Ride,” spotlighting bassist Nathaniel Phillips, who wrote the track along with Elliot and Braun, Summer Madness is one of those albums that simply takes hold the moment you press play and never lets go. Along the way it touches down on a variety of moods and styles, from Latin- and African-inspired funk to soul jazz, even flirting with fusion on the hard-driving, appropriately titled “Ludicrous Speed.”

A couple of sparkling ballads pay tribute to heroes of Elliot’s going back to his earliest days of musical discovery: “Europa,” on which he honors one of his saxophone inspirations, the late Gato Barbieri—who famously remade the Carlos Santana-penned track in his own image, and the title track “Summer Madness,” a mid-’70s hit for funk titans Kool & the Gang.

Among the original compositions, “Harry the Hipster,” says Elliot, “is reminiscent of songs that had cool, recurring melodies and a funky pulse—the idea was not to wrap yourself up in how much complexity you could put into the song, but how much feeling and groove can you put into the song?” Another highlight, the band-written “West Coast Jam,” is Elliot’s nod to yet another influence, the late leader of funk trailblazers Zapp, Roger Troutman, while “Breakin’ It Down,” which arrives early on Summer Madness, is designed, he says, to bridge the genres of funk and contemporary jazz, with which Elliot has long been associated. “I sort of formulated that theory later though,” he confesses. “When we were making the music we were just making it.”

It should come as no surprise to Elliot’s longtime fans that he would, at some point in his career, choose to celebrate funk in such a dedicated, decisive way. It was, after all, with the legendary Tower of Power that many first heard the saxophone virtuosity of Richard Elliot. Although he was born in Scotland and grew up in Los Angeles, where he started playing saxophone while in middle school, his five-year run with the Bay Area institution ToP during the 1980s was when Richard Elliot first came to prominence.

“I learned more about being a musician, about being a performer, about being a team player in a horn section, about how to make a statement when you step out and do a solo, from being with Tower of Power than from any other group or artist I ever worked with,” Elliot says, adding that it was “initially terrifying” to find himself among some of the most accomplished and highly respected musicians on the funk/R&B scene. In fact, he learned enough from working with them, Elliot says now, to know that he was ready to go off on his own when he did.

“Leaving Tower of Power was the hardest decision I ever made,” he says now, but great things were to follow almost immediately. By the late ’80s, Elliot had launched his solo career and was signed to Blue Note Records, where he worked with the legendary record executive Bruce Lundvall, an early champion of Elliot’s work. Since then, Elliot has released more than 20 albums as a leader, and has also polished his chops serving as a sideman for a considerable list of diverse giants, including Motown hitmakers Smokey Robinson and the Temptations. One of Elliot’s favorite projects was the collaborative 2013 release Summer Horns, which found him teaming up with fellow sax-slingers Dave Koz, Gerald Albright and Mindi Abair—the album was nominated for a Grammy in the category of Best Pop Instrumental Album.

Throughout all of his music, Richard Elliot has always strived to achieve one certain goal. “Miles Davis said, ‘The hardest thing for a musician to do is sound like himself.’ That stuck with me,” Elliot says. “If you fixate on a single influence, you tend to sound like someone who’s trying to sound like that person. I never know if I’ve achieved that goal but on occasion I’ve had someone come up to me and say, ‘I heard a song on the radio and I knew it was you.’” Summer Madness puts a bit of a new twist on the classic Richard Elliot sound, but you won’t doubt for a single second who you are hearing.

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Thursday, August 25, 2016

Resilient jazz singer Anna Danes finds her wings #jazz

Emboldened by her own recent diagnosis, the chanteuse aims to empower and educate others with “Find Your Wings,” set to take flight during National Breast Cancer Awareness Month.  
 
It was against all odds that Anna Danes found herself standing in Capitol Records Studio A, in front of the same microphone used by her role models, Frank Sinatra and Nat King Cole, recording an a cappella song that she wrote for her sophomore album. In the dimly lit studio in the heart of Hollywood, the woman who escaped communist Poland as a child and overcame the pain and loneliness of a loveless marriage by discovering her voice just three years ago poured her broken heart into the intimate album closer, “I Love You,” as producer Dave Darling sat spellbound at the recording console. In the famed studio during sessions financed by selling a car, Danes shared her deeply personal tales of love and loss through the six acoustic jazz songs that she wrote for “Find Your Wings,” the DLG Records disc scheduled for release on October 14 that is completed by five standards and a stunning interpretation of blues singer Janiva Magness’ “When You Were My King.”
 
Late last month, as Danes plotted with her marketing and promotions team to gear up for the upcoming album release, she was diagnosed with breast cancer. True to the theme of “Find Your Wings,” the positive-minded vocalist faced her worst fears, saw the silver lining and penned a motivational blog, “Cancer Part 1: Vanity Saved My Life,” to help educate and encourage others facing their own health and personal challenges (http://www.annadanes.com/2016/07/31/cancer-part-1-vanity-saved-life/).
 
When Danes began the recording project that is slated to street during National Breast Cancer Awareness Month, she had the desire to emulate the sound of a pair of jazz vocal albums from the esteemed duo of Tony Bennett and Bill Evans. Darling kept Danes’ captivating and expressive voice front and center in the mix using only sparse accompaniment from pianist Rich Ruttenberg, drummer John Ferraro and bassist Trey Henry. Blessed with a classic voice possessing charm, warmth, elegance and grace, Danes’ patient delivery and vocal phrasing uncoils with poise and complete control despite the vulnerability and intensity of her emotion-charged subject matter. Love is her ever-present muse on “Find Your Wings.” On originals, she sings a haunting melody on “The Voice,” pines hopefully on “See You In L.A.” and longs to see forever in the eyes of her lover on “Long Distance.” Among those she interprets from the Great American Songbook are Michel Legrand’s “I Will Wait For You,” Sammy Cahn’s “It’s Crazy” and Johnny Mercer’s “I Want To Be Around” while on the romantic duet “That’s All,” she takes enduring vows with Richard Shelton’s debonair tenor.            
 
“I’m a very late bloomer in life. For the majority of my life, I’ve either had little confidence or have drafted off other people’s confidence and floated under their wings,” said Danes, who wrote the title track with Cindy Alexander. “Cindy asked me what I wanted to write about. I told her about my story post-separation and how I found my voice and confidence through music. Bam! That’s all that was needed to start the creative process. What was supposed to be a song about finding hope, turned into an anthem about finding yourself, your true purpose, your voice, your identity and so much more.”
 
Finding her voice has been life transforming for the former lawyer and stay-at-home mom who has called San Diego home for the past 16 years. Danes hopes to empower people to pursue their passions and dreams with the songs on “Find Your Wings,” which will also be the subject of her first book, personal growth products and motivational speeches on the corporate circuit. Via music, writing and speaking, Danes’ encouraging message is that by facing your fears - in health and any personal challenge – you can break out of your cage, find your wings and transform your life. 
 
Although she sang as a child in church after arriving in Sweden and settling in Canada after escaping Poland with her parents in 1979, Danes didn’t sing again until 2013 when her young daughter cried boredom and refused to participate at a vocal lesson. Since the lesson was already paid for, Danes stepped in. She released her debut album that same year, “Longing,” which was an extravagantly produced and elaborately-orchestrated collection of standards and modern pop tunes. Her love of jazz spawned the mission to bring more live jazz to the San Diego area through her own event production and promotion company, which produces the Jazz on Cedros series. For more information, please visit www.AnnaDanes.com.         
 
“Find Your Wings” contains the following songs:
 
“When You Were My King”
“I Will Wait For You”
“It’s Crazy”
“I Want To Be Around”/”Cry Me A River”
“Find Your Wings”
“That’s All”
“Long Distance”
“In The Wee Small Hours”
“See You In L.A.”
“Mr. OMG”
“The Voice”
“I Love You”

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Monday, August 22, 2016

Smooth Jazz Chart - Weekly Top 20 - August 22, 2016 #jazz


TW - LW - Artist - Album - (Label)
1 - 1 - 3rd Force - "Glocal Force" - (Baja/TSR)
2 - 4 - Euge Groove - "Still Euge" - (Shanachie)
3 - 2 - The Rippingtons - "True Stories" - (Peak/eONE)
4 - 3 - BWB - "BWB" - (Artistry/Mack Avenue)
5 - 6 - Paul Jackson Jr. - "Stories From Stompin' Willie - (Branch, Records Inc.)
6 - 7 - Chris Standring - "Ten" - (Ultimate Vibe Recordings)
7 - 9 - Boney James - "Futuresoul" - (Concord Music)
8 - 8 - Keiko Matsui - "Journey To The Heart" - (Shanachie)
9 - 10 - Michael Lington "Second Nature" - (Copenhagen Music)
10 - 5 - John Novello - "Ivory Soul" - (529 Music)
11 - 18 - Kim Waters - "Rhythm and Romance" - (Shanachie)
12 - 15 - Incognito - "In Search Of Better Days" - (Shanachie)
13 - 14 - Will Downing - "Black Pearls" - (Shanachie)
14 - 20 - James Day - "Repertoire" - (Song King)
15 - 19 - Pieces Of A Dream - "All In" - (Shanachie)
16 - 13 - Vincent Ingala - "Coast To Coast" - (Independent)
17 - 11 - Nick Colionne - "The Journey" - (Trippin 'N' Rhythm)
18 - 12 - Jonathan Fritzen - "Fritzenied" - (Nordic Night Records)
19 - 24 - Tony Saunders - "Uptown Jazz" - (San Francisco Records)
20 - 26 - Dave Bradshaw Jr. - "Set Me Free" - (MOKU Records)


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Tuesday, August 16, 2016

4-time Grammy winner Gordon Goodwin allows his jazz band to open up on "An Elusive Man," arriving September 9

Smaller yet still Phat: 4-time Grammy winner Gordon Goodwin allows his jazz band to open up on“An Elusive Man,” arriving September 9

Having amassed 20 Grammy nominations, four statues and three Emmy wins, Gordon Goodwin is the most decorated big band leader in the 21st century. After all six of his Big Phat Band albums have garnered Grammy nominations or wins, he’s not elusive about why he trimmed his large 18-piece ensemble for an outing as the 8-member  Little Phat Band, which will release their debut album, “An Elusive Man,” on September 9 via the Music of Content  label.   

“It represents another side of my interest in jazz with more emphasis on improvisation and letting the musicians explore things in a way that they can’t do in a larger ensemble. The music I write for this band covers a wide range of styles, from swing to Latin to funk and more. The seven musicians who join me in making up the Little Phat Band are all members of the Big Phat Band and are, to a man, the most accomplished and versatile musicians that I know,” said Goodwin, who produced and arranged the date while composing eight new songs for the ten-tune set.

Goodwin’s Little Phat Band – Goodwin (piano and tenor sax), Wayne Bergeron (trumpet), Eric Marienthal (alto and tenor sax), Andy Martin (trombone), Andrew Synowiec (electric and acoustic guitar), Rick Shaw (electric and acoustic bass), Bernie Dresel (drums) and Joey De Leon (percussion) – fills the diverse “An Elusive Man” with regal swing, elegant be-bop and effulgent Latin jazz rhythms along with soulful jazz funk jams. Throughout the collection adeptly balancing serious and somber with playful fun and quirk, astute musicianship is on full display with the players granted more room to bob and weave spontaneously than in the tightly-scripted big band settings to which they are typically confined. Goodwin’s communicative piano ruminations and probing tenor sax explorations carve space to solo as do Marienthal’s roaring tenor and penetrating alto sax, Bergeron’s commanding and eloquent trumpet, Martin’s character-rich trombone, Shaw’s rock-steady bass and Synowiec’s adaptable electric guitar that pierces tunes with expansive straight-ahead and contemporary jazz riffs as well as country licks.    

As for the album’s title, Goodwin reveals, “It is a reference to people we all know who go through life in fear and hide behind their jobs, their sense of humor or even their skill sets, but never really reveal much about themselves. They present a public persona, often a well-crafted one, but we never get to see who they are inside.”

Breaking into the industry while still a student at California State University Northridge, Goodwin, a native of Wichita, Kansas, began by writing music for various aspects of the Disneyland park, which eventually led to composing and orchestration gigs in such films as “The Incredibles,” “Remember The Titans,” “Armageddon,” “Get Smart,” “The Sorcerer’s Apprentice,” “National Treasure” and “Gone in 60 Seconds.” His inventive scoring and orchestrations for television garnered three Emmys while his resume boasts crafting music for Quincy Jones, Christina Aguilera, Johnny Mathis, John Williams, Ray Charles, Natalie Cole, Sarah Vaughan and Mel Torme. Longing to forge his own legacy, he formed the Big Phat Band, which debuted in 2000 with “Swingin’ for the Fences,” nabbing a pair of Grammy nominations. Each release that followed cemented the unit’s place as the preeminent big band with Grammy nominations and wins for albums featuring contributions from Eddie Daniels, Arturo Sandoval, David Sanborn, Brian McKnight, Dianne Reeves, Take 6, Lee Ritenour, Patti Austin, Chick Corea, Dave Grusin, Dave Koz, Gerald Albright and Marcus Miller. The group’s most recent offering, 2014’s “Life in the Bubble,” snared four nods along with the Grammy for Best Large Jazz Ensemble Album. Goodwin shares his ardor for the big band sound that first captured his imagination on “Phat Tracks with Gordon Goodwin,” a radio show airing weekends on KJAZZ, America’s jazz and blues station. For more information, please visit www.GordonGoodwin.com.
“An Elusive Man” contains the following songs:
“The LP Shuffle”
“Cot in the Act”
“Behind You”
“An Elusive Man”
“Samba Cya”
“Garaje Gato”
“I Know You”
“Walkin’”
“In a Sentimental Mood”
“Why We Can’t Have Nice Things”

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Monday, August 15, 2016

Smooth Jazz Chart - Weekly Top 20 - August 15, 2016 #jazz


TW - LW - Artist - Album - (Label)
1 - 1 - 3rd Force - "Glocal Force" - (Baja/TSR)
2 - 3 - The Rippingtons - "True Stories" - (Peak/eONE)
3 - 5 - BWB - "BWB" - (Artistry/Mack Avenue)
4 - 4 - Euge Groove - "Still Euge" - (Shanachie)
5 - 8 - John Novello - "Ivory Soul" - (529 Music)
6 - 2 - Paul Jackson Jr. - "Stories From Stompin' Willie - (Branch, Records Inc.)
7 - 6 - Chris Standring - "Ten" - (Ultimate Vibe Recordings)
8 - 7 - Keiko Matsui - "Journey To The Heart" - (Shanachie)
9 - 37 - Boney James - "Futuresoul" - (Concord Music)
10 - 13 - Michael Lington "Second Nature" - (Copenhagen Music)
11 - 10 - Nick Colionne - "The Journey" - (Trippin 'N' Rhythm)
12 - 20 - Jonathan Fritzen - "Fritzenied" - (Nordic Night Records)
13 - 11 - Vincent Ingala - "Coast To Coast" - (Independent)
14 - 15 - Will Downing - "Black Pearls" - (Shanachie)
15 - 12 - Incognito - "In Search Of Better Days" - (Shanachie)
16 - 27 - Donald Hayes - "Front Ground" - (DonaldHayesMusic.com)
17 - 21 - Steve Cole - "Turn It Up" - (Atistry/Mack Avenue)
18 - 9 - Kim Waters - "Rhythm and Romance" - (Shanachie)
19 - 19 - Pieces Of A Dream - "All In" - (Shanachie)
20 - 18 - James Day - "Repertoire" - (Song King)


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Wednesday, August 10, 2016

Saxophonist Richard Elliot Celebrates His Funk And R&B Roots On Summer Madness - #jazz

 
Elliot joins forces with trumpeter/trombonist/producer Rick Braun
on September 9, 2016 release
 
When tenor saxophonist Richard Elliot began preparing Summer Madness, his follow-up to 2014’s critically acclaimed Lip Service, he knew exactly what he wanted to do. First and foremost, it had to be funky. “When I was growing up in the ’70s and first learning to play the saxophone,” he says, “I was mostly attracted to instrumentally based R&B and to jazz that had R&B roots. This record definitely goes down that path, leaning more on the funk side.”
 
He also knew precisely who he wanted to accompany him on the new music. “I wanted to involve my band,” Elliot says. “A lot of artists tour with a group of musicians, and then when it’s time to make a record they hook up with a producer and go into the studio and use completely different people that maybe they’ve never even met before. I feel that if you’re lucky enough to have a regular group of musicians that you work with, and you don’t draw on their talent and their inspirations, you’re short-changing yourself.”
 
Summer Madness, set for release on September 9, 2016 via Heads Up, a division of Concord Music Group, is a new kind of Richard Elliot recording. For one thing, the cast includes two other horn men augmenting Elliot’s signature sax work: trumpeter/trombonist Rick Braun, who also produced the album and, on several tracks, baritone saxophonist Curt Waylee. Most importantly though, the music was created from scratch as Elliot and his handpicked musicians formulated and honed their ideas in the studio, with Braun’s ultra-capable guidance. For Elliot, recruiting the additional players and having the entire band—plus a well-respected veteran producer help him shape the music—was integral to the project’s success.
 
“I didn’t want to direct them,” he says. “I wanted to bring them in and let them be part of the process—the writing, the arranging—and to do it all together. I had a lot of confidence that these guys are mature enough musically. Everybody brought what they do to the table and we all put our heads together. We didn’t have rehearsals first, we didn’t have writing sessions first. We booked some days in the studio and the music just poured out.”
 
The result of these impromptu jams—seven new originals and three classic interpretations—is unquestionably one of the most electrifying and gratifying recordings of Richard Elliot’s three-plus-decade solo career. From the opening salvo, a super-funkified take on Spyro Gyra’s “Cachaca,” through the closing “Mr. Nate’s Wild Ride,” spotlighting bassist Nathaniel Phillips, who wrote the track along with Elliot and Braun, Summer Madness is one of those albums that simply takes hold the moment you press play and never lets go. Along the way it touches down on a variety of moods and styles, from Latin- and African-inspired funk to soul jazz, even flirting with fusion on the hard-driving, appropriately titled “Ludicrous Speed.”
 
A couple of sparkling ballads pay tribute to heroes of Elliot’s going back to his earliest days of musical discovery: “Europa,” on which he honors one of his saxophone inspirations, the late Gato Barbieri—who famously remade the Carlos Santana-penned track in his own image, and the title track “Summer Madness,” a mid-’70s hit for funk titans Kool & the Gang.
 
Among the original compositions, “Harry the Hipster,” says Elliot, “is reminiscent of songs that had cool, recurring melodies and a funky pulse—the idea was not to wrap yourself up in how much complexity you could put into the song, but how much feeling and groove can you put into the song?” Another highlight, the band-written “West Coast Jam,” is Elliot’s nod to yet another influence, the late leader of funk trailblazers Zapp, Roger Troutman, while “Breakin’ It Down,” which arrives early on Summer Madness, is designed, he says, to bridge the genres of funk and contemporary jazz, with which Elliot has long been associated. “I sort of formulated that theory later though,” he confesses. “When we were making the music we were just making it.”
 
It should come as no surprise to Elliot’s longtime fans that he would, at some point in his career, choose to celebrate funk in such a dedicated, decisive way. It was, after all, with the legendary Tower of Power that many first heard the saxophone virtuosity of Richard Elliot. Although he was born in Scotland and grew up in Los Angeles, where he started playing saxophone while in middle school, his five-year run with the Bay Area institution ToP during the 1980s was when Richard Elliot first came to prominence.
 
“I learned more about being a musician, about being a performer, about being a team player in a horn section, about how to make a statement when you step out and do a solo, from being with Tower of Power than from any other group or artist I ever worked with,” Elliot says, adding that it was “initially terrifying” to find himself among some of the most accomplished and highly respected musicians on the funk/R&B scene. In fact, he learned enough from working with them, Elliot says now, to know that he was ready to go off on his own when he did.
 
“Leaving Tower of Power was the hardest decision I ever made,” he says now, but great things were to follow almost immediately. By the late ’80s, Elliot had launched his solo career and was signed to Blue Note Records, where he worked with the legendary record executive Bruce Lundvall, an early champion of Elliot’s work. Since then, Elliot has released more than 20 albums as a leader, and has also polished his chops serving as a sideman for a considerable list of diverse giants, including Motown hitmakers Smokey Robinson and the Temptations. One of Elliot’s favorite projects was the collaborative 2013 release Summer Horns, which found him teaming up with fellow sax-slingers Dave Koz, Gerald Albright and Mindi Abair—the album was nominated for a Grammy in the category of Best Pop Instrumental Album.
 
Throughout all of his music, Richard Elliot has always strived to achieve one certain goal. “Miles Davis said, ‘The hardest thing for a musician to do is sound like himself.’ That stuck with me,” Elliot says. “If you fixate on a single influence, you tend to sound like someone who’s trying to sound like that person. I never know if I’ve achieved that goal but on occasion I’ve had someone come up to me and say, ‘I heard a song on the radio and I knew it was you.’” Summer Madness puts a bit of a new twist on the classic Richard Elliot sound, but you won’t doubt for a single second who you are hearing.
 
Date
Venue
City
State
17-Aug-16
Racine Zoo Bandshell (Animal Crackers Jazz Series)
Racine
WI
20-Aug-16
Copper Mountain Resort
Frisco
CA
26-Aug-16
Scullers Jazz Club
Boston
MA
27-Aug-16
Jamesport Vineyards
Jamesport
NY
07-Oct-16
Ft. Sam Houston Theater
San Antonio
TX
08-Oct-16
Bishop Arts Theater
Dallas
TX
09-Oct-16
Cullen Theater
Houston
TX
16-Oct-16
Thornton Winery
Temecula
CA
04-Nov-16
The Jazz Kitchen
Indianapolis
IN
05-Nov-16
The Jazz Kitchen
Indianapolis
IN
11-Nov-16
Tangier-Cabaret Room
Akron
OH
12-Nov-16
SmoothChicago.com Showroom @ Loews Chicago O'Hare Hotel
Rosemont
IL
16-Nov-16
BB King Blues Club and Grill
New York
NY
17-Nov-16
Buffalo State Performing Arts Center
Buffalo
NY
13-Jan-17
Crowne Plaza Melbourne Oceanfront
Melbourne
FL
14-Jan-17
Crowne Plaza Melbourne Oceanfront
Melbourne
FL
21 thru 28 Jan-17
Smooth Jazz Cruise
Ft. Lauderdale
FL
09 thru 23 May-17
The Dave Koz Cruise
Venice
ITALY

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Monday, August 08, 2016

Smooth Jazz Chart - Weekly Top 20 - August 8, 2016 #jazz


TW - LW - Artist - Album - (Label)
1 - 1 - 3rd Force - "Glocal Force" - (Baja/TSR)
2 - 4 - Paul Jackson Jr. - "Stories From Stompin' Willie - (Branch, Records Inc.)
3 - 3 - The Rippingtons - "True Stories" - (Peak/eONE)
4 - 2 - Euge Groove - "Still Euge" - (Shanachie)
5 - 6 - BWB - "BWB" - (Artistry/Mack Avenue)
6 - 5 - Chris Standring - "Ten" - (Ultimate Vibe Recordings)
7 - 11 - Keiko Matsui - "Journey To The Heart" - (Shanachie)
8 - 13 - John Novello - "Ivory Soul" - (529 Music)
9 - 7 - Kim Waters - "Rhythm and Romance" - (Shanachie)
10 - 12 - Nick Colionne - "The Journey" - (Trippin 'N' Rhythm)
11 - 14 - Vincent Ingala - "Coast To Coast" - (Independent)
12 - 15 - Incognito - "In Search Of Better Days" - (Shanachie)
13 - 29 - Michael Lington "Second Nature" - (Copenhagen Music)
14 - 9 - Marcus Anderson - "And Coffee" - (Anderson Music-LLC)
15 - 8 - Will Downing - "Black Pearls" - (Shanachie)
16 - 10 - Adam Hawley - "Just The Beginning" - (Kalimba)
17 - 16 - Fourplay - "Silver - (Concord Music Group)
18 - 20 - James Day - "Repertoire" - (Song King)
19 - 17 - Pieces Of A Dream - "All In" - (Shanachie)
20 - 36 - Jonathan Fritzen - "Fritzenied" - (Nordic Night Records)


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